Monthly Archives: January 2012

Committee for Bellarine Membership – Associate

Associate and Local Government Members


Associate members:

 are buying access to information and networking opportunities, have the right to share their opinions, contribute to outcomes and be elected to the Board.
Outside of the Board, they do not have voting rights.
Associate members are likely to be individuals
with small business located on The Bellarine but need not be.

            Available to:

Generally to individuals and businesses with an interest in The Bellarine.
The Board will seek annual Expressions of Interest. Membership is
restricted to one year terms of membership but may be extended.

 Committee for Bellarine 

We thank you for your interest and look forward to an ongoing and fruitful partnership.

 

Membership Application form here


Committee for Bellarine Key Programs – Bellarine 2050

  The Bellarine 2050 Program

 Program description:

To conduct thorough quantitative and qualitative research and analysis towards building a comprehensive data base and current assessment of The Bellarine..

  • committee for bellarine

    objectives and actions:

    Bellarine 2050 Program:

    • a) To conduct thorough quantitative and qualitative research and analysis towards building a comprehensive and cohesive Data Base and current assessment of The Bellarine.

    • b) To identify major needs, issues and opportunities that will benefit community, environment, commerce and future development on The Bellarine using the Data Base.

  • Bellarine 2050 Program objectives:

  • Develop a comprehensive Data Base and information/research resource for community, commercial, government and planning organisations.

  • Identify major issues, needs, priorities and opportunities on The Bellarine.

  • Develop recommendations for key actions and projects.

  • Establish within Deakin, a best practice model for community research, review and development that is transferable and useable across Australia.

  • Facilitation of ongoing community planning, and environmental development on the Bellarine.  Enhance community and liveability
    on The Bellarine.

  • Collaboration by Deakin with Committee for Bellarine to ensure local knowledge and participation in development and implementation.

    Enable Bellarine residents and community to have input and influence in future direction and development at all levels.

    Bellarine 2050 Scope / current and future:

 

Locational boundaries

Demographics and behaviors

Economic, employment, and investment opportunities

Commerce, rural, and tourism

Sport, leisure and recreation

Environment, ecology and sustainability

Built environment and infrastructure

Community and liveability

Health and wellbeing

Social & cultural issues

Education and training

Technology and communication

Resources and energy needs

Key stakeholders and alliances

Macro issues and opportunities

Critical issues – internal & external

Collateral issues inward and outward


Deakin University will assist CfB contributing relevant resources.

Cell phones, 3D TV, video chat: all predicted in 1954 video

Cell phones, 3D TV, video chat: all predicted in 1954 video

A film unearthed from the GE archives predicts the future of consumer technology, with some innovations that quite accurately predict some of the devices that have just come on the scene over the past decade.

For example, the film predicts that the space-age home will have a device hooked to the television that’s similar to a DVR, except that it’s controlled by an analog dial versus a remote or on-screen display.

The film also shows a clip of husband and wife chatting over two-way video.
Perhaps most astounding is the image of a 1954 man pulling a hand-held phone out of his pocket to answer a call. The narrator does warn, however, that “you’ll never be able to get away from your telephone, it will be right in your pocket”

The TV of the future is a flat-panel, large-screen device hanging on the wall, capable of 3D imagery.
Ominously however, the large-screen TV shows a nuclear explosion in 3D — with the presumed message that atomic power is being converted to peaceful purposes. Also notable is the prediction about computers (”electronic brains”) capable of doing everything except procreate.
Some of the misses include nitrogen-spewing planes that can replenish barren fields; lighted walls replacing lamps, self-closing windows, and the radio watch.
Also still off in Jetsons-land is water and soap-free dishwashers that employ ultrasonic vibrations to clean dishwashers, and programmable ovens that automatically prepare recipes.
The film was produced and released to coincide with GE’s “Diamond Jubilee,” or the 75th anniversary of the development of Edison’s lamp in 1879.

By Joe McKendrick | December 17, 2011, 5:00 AM PST

Mexico City shuts last landfill – 2011

Mexico City shuts last landfill, envisions composting, recycling.

MEXICO CITY—Mornings, trash collectors here sweep with handmade brooms, brushing away debris with the singular swooshing sound of sticks on pavement.

WASTE - our next energy source?

Garbage collection in the metropolitan area features all sorts of other peculiarities, too:

a rickety fleet of exhaust-spewing garbage trucks that don’t fit with the city’s otherwise stringent air quality regulations; cart-pushing trash collectors who ring the doorbells of residences and pick up bulging bags for a tip; horse-drawn carts in the outskirts that haul dirty chariots full of refuse to station where it is all loaded onto trucks and hauled to a landfill. Public waste bins are strategically located in tourist and business centers but are not ubiquitous.

Trash was the talk of the town this week, with the closing of the city’s last major landfill and the announcement of plans to install 700 public garbage containers throughout the city, embark on a comprehensive recycling and composting effort and open a call for offers to build a biogas-fueled electricity plant.
Mayor Marcelo Ebrard symbolically shuttered the landfill, known as the Bordo Poniente, on Monday, and the dump is scheduled to stop accepting on Friday the 12,600 tons of trash that arrive there daily. The 927-acre landfill holds about 72 million tons of trash accumulated over the past 17 years; it releases about 2 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere annually.
City officials are betting that biogas (made up largely of methane and carbon dioxide) produced naturally in the landfill can be captured and converted into electricity – which in turn could power the new Metro line under construction here. The city is expected to open an international call for proposals to take advantage of the biogas in the coming days.
What city officials aren’t saying is exactly where the trash is going to go in the meantime. A city spokesman said the information wasn’t public yet.
The official plan to divert trash calls for organic matter separated in households, by trash collectors themselves or by pepenadores, people who work as trash separators at dumping sites to be composted while recyclable materials will be reconstituted or burned as fuel at cement factories. But Mexico City’s Reforma newspaper reported that tons of trash this week were being hauled out of town to landfills in surrounding Mexico state.
The 700 trash containers, meanwhile, will be installed in areas near clandestine dumps in the city in hopes that people will decide to toss their trash in the bin for city pick-up.
Ebrard said in a speech at the edge of the Bordo Poniente on Monday: “We need to adjust several processes, logistics, in the city. That’s what we’re going to do this week.”
Trash was the talk of the town this week, with the closing of the city’s last major landfill and the announcement of plans to install 700 public garbage containers throughout the city, embark on a comprehensive recycling and composting effort and open a call for offers to build a biogas-fueled electricity plant. Mayor Marcelo Ebrard symbolically shuttered the landfill, known as the Bordo Poniente, on Monday, and the dump is scheduled to stop accepting on Friday the 12,600 tons of trash that arrive there daily.
The 927-acre landfill holds about 72 million tons of trash accumulated over the past 17 years; it releases about 2 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere annually. City officials are betting that biogas (made up largely of methane and carbon dioxide) produced naturally in the landfill can be captured and converted into electricity – which in turn could power the new Metro line under construction here.
The city is expected to open an international call for proposals to take advantage of the biogas in the coming days. What city officials aren’t saying is exactly where the trash is going to go in the meantime. A city spokesman said the information “wasn’t public” yet. The official plan to divert trash calls for organic matter – separated in households, by trash collectors themselves or by pepenadores, people who work as trash separators at dumping sites – to be composted while recyclable materials will be reconstituted or burned as fuel at cement factories.
But Mexico City’s Reforma newspaper reported that tons of trash this week were being hauled out of town to landfills in surrounding Mexico state. The 700 trash containers, meanwhile, will be installed in areas near clandestine dumps in the city in hopes that people will decide to toss their trash in the bin for city pick-up.
Ebrard said in a speech at the edge of the Bordo Poniente on Monday: “We need to adjust several processes, logistics, in the city. That’s what we’re going to do this week.”
By Lauren Villagran | December 21, 2011, 5:00 AM PST

One-third of US households now use mobile only

One-third of US households now use mobile only.

A study by the US government finds that a significant slice of American households now only use mobile phones and have abandoned landlines completely.

Preliminary results from the January–June 2011 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) indicate that the number of American homes with only wireless telephones continues to grow.

More than 3 of every 10 American homes (32%) had only wireless telephones (including cellular telephones, cell phones, or mobile phones) during the first half of 2011—an increase of close to 2 percentage points since the second half of 2010. In addition, nearly one of every six American homes (16%) received all or almost all calls on wireless telephones despite also having a landline telephone. telephone-olivetti-rotary-dial-telephone-c-1940s-300px-alt_telefon
The estimates are based on in-person interviews that NHIS conducts continuously throughout the year to collect information on health status, health-related behaviors, and health care utilization.
The survey also includes information about household telephones and whether anyone in the household has a wireless telephone. The findings, which show the landline rapidly fading as a household staple, have far-reaching implications for telecom providers, local and regional governments (including emergency responders and infrastructure planners), and research firms that rely on telephone surveys to gather data.
The NHIS survey also found that wireless-only households prevail among several demographic groups: Younger people: Nearly 6 in 10 adults aged 25–29 (58%) lived in households with only wireless telephones. The percentage of adults living in households with only wireless telephones decreased as age increased beyond 35 years: 34% for adults aged 35–44; 22% for adults aged 45–64; and 8% for adults aged 65 and over. Roomate situations: Nearly three in four adults living only with unrelated adult roommates (71%) were in households with only wireless telephones.
This rate is nearly twice as high as the rate for adults living alone (38%) and three times as high as the rate for adults living only with spouses or other adult family members (23%). Renters: More than half of adults renting their homes (52%) had only wireless telephones.
This rate is more than twice as large as the rate for adults owning their home (21%). Men: Men (31%) were more likely than women (29%) to be living in households with only wireless telephones.
Lower-income groups: Adults living in poverty (47%) and adults living near poverty (38%) were more likely than higher-income adults (28%) to be living in households with only wireless telephones.
By Joe McKendrick |                     December 21, 2011, 3:44 PM PST