Five things we learned this week ….

 By Giles Parkinson on 4 May 2012 / For full article refer http://reneweconomy.com.au/2012/five-things-we-learned-this-week-16175

We are not alone

If you ignore the 27 countries in the EU emissions trading scheme, a handful of others with their own carbon tax, New Zealand, and a bunch of north American states and provinces, including California, then Australia is completely alone in forging ahead with a carbon price. Well, it was.                                                                                                                             South Korea, despite intense lobbying from industry, this week passed a bill with almost unanimous support to begin an ETS in 2015. That seeks to cut its emissions to 30 per cent below business as usual by 2020, which is even more ambitious than Australia, which will result in a 23 per cent cut (at its current 5 per cent absolute reduction from 1990). ………………………………………….

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Clive Palmer is funny

Clive Palmer clearly has a sense of humour. TCPS (The Clive Palmer Show) began the week with consecutive matinee performances in Brisbane, the first to announce he would spend the next 15 months knocking on doors in the seat of Lilley in a bid to unseat the sitting member, the Treasurer Wayne Swan. Or he would end an emissary.

The second matinee performance was the coup-de grace. Just a fortnight after the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, TCPS announced he would build a modern version of the Titanic, backed by Chinese interests, presumably to re-enact the whole thing over again. But let’s just put this in context. ……………………………………

Start-stop on renewables?

One hand giveth, and the other taketh away. On the same day that Origin Energy announced that it had entered its largest ever power purchase agreement, for a 270MW, $600 million wind farm in South Australia, giving hope that the wind energy industry might finally see the end of three years of stagnation, its managing director Grant King …………………..

Ferguson catches a wave of good intent

It seems that the Federal Government is finally determined that Australia should make more of its natural advantages than simply sell its best ideas and sun-bake and swim in its renewable resources. Last month, the government announced a $9.3 million project through the Australian Solar Institute to repatriate the rooftop version of a solar thermal technology developed in Sydney. ……………………………

This rule only applies to other people

For many years, miners have been leading the demonization of green energy subsidies, arguing that they were effectively supporting investments that would otherwise not be commercial. How ironic, then, that they should be using the same argument to support their arguments for the retention of the diesel fuel rebate, which returns round $2 billion a year to the coffers of mining companies using diesel for transport and energy supplies ………………………………………….

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